Massage

Massage therapy is one of the oldest methods of healing, as the practice of therapeutic massage can be traced back nearly 4,000 years. Statistics from both Health Canada 1  and the American Massage Therapy Association 2  show that millions of North Americans use it today.

Massage therapy refers to a comprehensive health management strategy focusing on the application of various techniques to positively affect the soft tissues and joints of the body. Massage techniques most commonly include pressure and compression, kneading, frictioning, and mobilizing to improve the health and condition of the muscles, tendons, skin, fascia or connective tissue of the body.

Today massage is thought of as a holistic therapy that complements medical treatment. The "Physician's Guide to Therapeutic Massage"  shows that massage can decrease pain, improve range of motion, improve mood, aid in the circulation of blood and lymph flow, reduce muscle and joint soreness, and improve sleep.

1  Health Canada (2003)Health Policy Research Bulletin. Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/iacb-dgiac/arad-draa/english/rmdd/bulletin/mainstream.html#page6
2  American Massage Therapy Association. (2001). Massage Therapy Consumer Fact Sheet

 

After Massage


It is not uncommon to experience muscle soreness a day or two after your massage treatment. The soreness is a result of direct contact with spasms in the muscle, as well as accumulated waste products in the tissue being naturally released into your system. This is similar to what many people experience after strenuous activity. This too shall pass…

Recommended after treatment care

Drinking plenty of water will help flush the released toxins out of your body, and soaking in a warm bath with Epson or mineral salts will assist in alleviating any soreness.

Your massage experience should be both pleasant and beneficial. We hope it will be the beginning of a life-long practice to help you enjoy the best possible health and wellness.